CRO (Conversion Rate Optimization)

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Yes, every time you turn around there seems to be yet another indecipherable, highfalutin’ tech term language or sophisticated set of algorithm runes that simply flummoxes you. At the same time, it is rather frightening how some new number crushing computer flashes up with high percentage predictions on what makes humans do what they do…and how to make them do what we want them to do.

Let’s make this very simple and straightforward: Conversion Rate Optimization means that you understand how to increase the number of people who buy your product or service. This formula for building up the paying client base is created by knowing who looks at what you put out there and then studying the ones who actually purchase along with the reasons or triggers that caused them to pull out their plastic and click through.

Easy! But then again, the whole point is taking out the guesswork and advancing a mathematical equation that can parse your raw numbers and capably predict what you need to do in real life to increase the outcomes you seek.

Now that you have the bone basics, let’s dive in a touch deeper…

Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) is a structured and systematic approach to improving the performance of your website. The information is gathered through insights —specifically, analytics and user feedback. It is all defined by your website’s unique objectives and needs (KPIs). In plain English: It takes the traffic you already have and makes the most of it.

Now, remember this is based on numbers and calculations. So, let’s take a quick moment and define exactly what Conversion Rate Optimization Is NOT…

CRO is not based on guesses, hunches, or what everyone else is doing, only YOU. CRO is not driven by the some person’s opinion; it is completely groups of equations without emotion. CRO is not about getting as many users as possible, regardless of quality or engagement. This is not a cattle call.

So, knowing what CRO is and is not, we move on to listing a few Key Terms involved with the CRO process. These are concepts and ideas that emerge continuously, so now is the best time to familiarize yourself with several of them.

Call to Action (CTA)

The primary button, link or other user interface element that asks the user to take an action that leads to (or towards) a conversion. This is the typical “Buy Now” button on Amazon.com, a “Sign Up” button on some email registration field, or a “Download Now” on an app landing page. These are all examples of different Calls to Action.

Conversion Funnel

This is the primary pathway (or flow) of the user experience where visitors complete a conversion. Example: on Amazon.com the funnel may be Home page > search results page > product page > checkout. Essentially, it is the logical, click through path to the final completion of the encounter, usually a sale.

A/B or Split Testing

The testing of one version of a page or interface element against another version of the same thing. Each element is measured by its overall effectiveness in direct comparison to the other. For example, a red button measured in effectiveness to a green button. In A/B testing only one thing is tested at a time.

Multivariate Testing (MVT)

The testing of multiple variations of many different page elements in various combinations to determine the best performing elements and sets. For example, a multivariate landing test may test many variations of the graphics, colors, photos, content, and calls to action used on the page in many combinations to find the best performer.

Now About Those Statistics…

Here’s an overview of the things you are going to measure in order to gauge your current rate of conversion, identify the trouble spots, and design a plan of action. You can get these numbers through Google Analytics, KISSmetrics, or another analytics service of your choosing. The numbers critical to CRO are as follows:

Let’s start with the numbers we’re looking to improve—

Conversion Rates

Your Total Conversions is number of people who did whatever it is defined as converting (email newsletter, made a purchase, and so on).

To get your Conversion Rate, you divide the above total number of conversions by the number of visitors to your site.

For example, a site with 5000 visitors and 50 conversions has a conversion rate of 1%.But do you know how long people stay on your site? Do you know which pages they visit while there? This next set of numbers can help you to form some testable hypotheses. Looking at your Bounce and Exit Rates, as well as your Engagement Metrics. This is the first step in making sense of your conversion rate.

Bounce Rate

Your Bounce Rate is the percentage of people who leave after viewing a single page. A high bounce rate is not a good thing–for whatever reason, people aren’t finding what they’re looking for so they leave almost immediately.

Exit Rate

You also have a specific Exit Rate for each page; it’s the percentage of people who leave after viewing the page. Your exit rate lets you know the last page that users view before they move on. A very high exit rate on a specific page can be a red flag.

Average Time on Site

An Engagement Metric, the Average Time on Site of users gives you a general idea how long people are sticking around. A high bounce rate means a low average time on site—visitors aren’t sticking around long enough to do whatever it is you want them to do.

Average Page Views

Similarly, Average Page Views is an Engagement Metric that tells you how many pages the average visitor through before leaving. More page views can mean engagement but also can mean a lack of clarity in your conversion funnel, if there is no conversion.

In conclusion, these are the metrics that matter. Take the example above—the site with 5,000 visitors per month but only 50 conversions could either pat themselves on the back for all those unique visitors or recognize that their conversion rate could be much better than 1% and then work to optimize those numbers. It all depends on you…what you serve, sell or seek.

Yes, as you can imagine, this is a vital new element to digital success. However, you have to know what the variables are and how to read and interpret and ultimately respond in order to drive business the direction and to the conclusion you seek.

It might be better to have an expert like BSG set is all up for you and monitor it, then report each month to give you the best direction with quickest responses and the least headaches.

Call Blue Sand Group Now! 800-303-8803

What the heck is this?

Yes, every time you turn around there seems to be yet another indecipherable, highfalutin’ tech term language or sophisticated set of algorithm runes that simply flummoxes you. At the same time, it is rather frightening how some new number crushing computer flashes up with high percentage predictions on what makes humans do what they do…and how to make them do what we want them to do.

Let’s make this very simple and straightforward: Conversion Rate Optimization means that you understand how to increase the number of people who buy your product or service. This formula for building up the paying client base is created by knowing who looks at what you put out there and then studying the ones who actually purchase along with the reasons or triggers that caused them to pull out their plastic and click through.

Easy! But then again, the whole point is taking out the guesswork and advancing a mathematical equation that can parse your raw numbers and capably predict what you need to do in real life to increase the outcomes you seek.

Now that you have the bone basics, let’s dive in a touch deeper…

Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) is a structured and systematic approach to improving the performance of your website. The information is gathered through insights —specifically, analytics and user feedback. It is all defined by your website’s unique objectives and needs (KPIs). In plain English: It takes the traffic you already have and makes the most of it.

Now, remember this is based on numbers and calculations, so, let’s take a quick moment and define exactly what Conversion Rate Optimization Is NOT…

CRO is not based on guesses, hunches, or what everyone else is doing, only YOU. CRO is not driven by the some person’s opinion; it is completely groups of equations without emotion. CRO is not about getting as many users as possible, regardless of quality or engagement. This is not a cattle call.

So, knowing what CRO is and is not, we move on to listing a few Key Terms involved with the CRO process. These are concepts and ideas that emerge continuously, so now is the best time to familiarize yourself with several of them.

Call to Action (CTA)

The primary button, link or other user interface element that asks the user to take an action that leads to (or towards) a conversion. This is the typical “Buy Now” button on Amazon.com, a “Sign Up” button on some email registration field, or a “Download Now” on an app landing page. These are all examples of different Calls to Action.

Conversion Funnel

This is the primary pathway (or flow) of the user experience where visitors complete a conversion. Example: on Amazon.com the funnel may be Home page > search results page > product page > checkout. Essentially, it is the logical, click through path to the final completion of the encounter, usually a sale.

A/B or Split Testing

The testing of one version of a page or interface element against another version of the same thing. Each element is measured by its overall effectiveness in direct comparison to the other. For example, a red button measured in effectiveness to a green button. In A/B testing only one thing is tested at a time.

Multivariate Testing (MVT)

The testing of multiple variations of many different page elements in various combinations to determine the best performing elements and sets. For example, a multivariate landing test may test many variations of the graphics, colors, photos, content, and calls to action used on the page in many combinations to find the best performer.

Now About Those Statistics…

Here’s an overview of the things you are going to measure in order to gauge your current rate of conversion, identify the trouble spots, and design a plan of action. You can get these numbers through Google Analytics, KISSmetrics, or another analytics service of your choosing. The numbers critical to CRO are as follows:

Let’s start with the numbers we’re looking to improve—

Conversion Rates

Your Total Conversions is number of people who did whatever it is defined as converting (email newsletter, made a purchase, and so on).

To get your Conversion Rate, divide the above total number of conversions by the number of visitors.

For example, a site with 5000 visitors and 50 conversions has a conversion rate of 1%. But do you know how long people stay on your site? Do you know which pages they visit while there? This next set of numbers can help you to form some testable hypotheses. Looking at your Bounce and Exit Rates, as well as your Engagement Metrics. This is the first step in making sense of your conversion rate.

Bounce Rate

Your Bounce Rate is the percentage of people who leave after viewing a single page. A high bounce rate is not a good thing–for whatever reason, people aren’t finding what they’re looking for so they leave almost immediately.

Exit Rate

You also have a specific Exit Rate for each page; it’s the percentage of people who leave after viewing the page. Your exit rate lets you know the last page that users view before they move on. A very high exit rate on a specific page can be a red flag.

Average Time on Site

An Engagement Metric, the Average Time on Site, gives you a general idea how long people are sticking around. A high bounce rate means a low average time on site—visitors aren’t sticking around long enough to do whatever it is you want them to do.

Average Page Views

Similarly, Average Page Views is an Engagement Metric that tells you how many pages the average visitor through before leaving. More page views mean engagement but also can mean a lack of clarity in your conversion funnel.

In conclusion, these are the metrics that matter. Take the example above—the site with 5,000 visitors per month but only 50 conversions could either pat themselves on the back for all those unique visitors or recognize that their conversion rate could be much better than 1% and then work to optimize those numbers. It all depends on you…what you serve, sell or seek.

Yes, as you can imagine, this is a vital new element to digital success. However, you have to know what the variables are and how to read and interpret and ultimately respond in order to drive business the direction and to the conclusion you seek.

It might be better to have an expert like BSG set is all up for you and monitor it, then report each month to give you the best direction with quickest responses and the least headaches.

Call Blue Sand Group Now! 800-303-8803

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